Eel
News and Events


Interagency Team Conducts Aerial and Ground Survey of Tsunami
Damage in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument

Download Press Release PDF(1.9mb)

Note: Some images may be considered disturbing for viewers.

C-130's at Air Station Barbers Point.   A U.S. Coast Guard C-130 flys over Kure Atoll-Green Island during a tsunami damage assessment flight.

C-130's at Air Station Barbers Point. (Photo: NOAA)

  A U.S. Coast Guard C-130 flys over Kure Atoll-Green Island during a tsunami damage assessment flight. (Photo: NOAA)
Kure Atoll is the northernmost island in the Hawaiian Archipelago and the first to experience tsunami impacts.   Lisianski Island was uninhabitated during the tsunami and appeared to have suffered little damage.

Kure Atoll is the northernmost island in the Hawaiian Archipelago and the first to experience tsunami impacts. (Photo: NOAA)

  Lisianski Island was uninhabitated during the tsunami and appeared to have suffered little damage. (Photo: NOAA)
North Island at Pearl & Hermes Atoll in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.   Midway Atoll is the most famous island in the Monument and also has the only permanent residents.

North Island at Pearl & Hermes Atoll in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. (Photo: NOAA)

  Midway Atoll is the most famous island in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument and also has the only permanent residents. (Photo: NOAA)
The tsunami swept across Midway Atoll's Eastern Island spreading plastic debris and killing thousands of birds.   While the loss of birds is significant, millions of tropical seabirds continue to use the NWHI for nesting and breeding.

The tsunami swept across Midway Atoll's Eastern Island spreading plastic debris and killing thousands of birds. (Photo: NOAA)

  While the loss of birds is significant, millions of tropical seabirds continue to use the NWHI for nesting and breeding. (Photo: NOAA)
A dead Laysan Albatross adult and chick at Eastern Island-Midway Atoll.   An unhatched egg and a dead Laysan Albatross chick.

A dead Laysan Albatross adult and chick at Eastern Island-Midway Atoll. (Photo: NOAA)

  An unhatched egg and a dead Laysan Albatross chick. (Photo: NOAA)
Workers are cleaning up bird carcasses at Midway Atoll.   More than 100,000 tropical seabirds were killed by the tsunami at Midway Atoll alone.

Workers are cleaning up bird carcasses at Midway Atoll. (Photo: NOAA)

  More than 100,000 tropical seabirds were killed by the tsunami at Midway Atoll alone. (Photo: NOAA)